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Psychedelic Press UK

Horizons: Perspectives on Psychedelics

October 12-14, 2012 – New York

Celebrating their Sixth Year!

Horizons is an annual forum for learning about psychedelics in New York City. Its goal is to open a fresh dialogue on their role in medicine, culture, history, spirituality, and creativity. During the 1960s, psychedelics entered worldwide popular culture. Fueled by the wild social dogmas of the era, recreational use become commonplace. Questions about their safety and value for were answered with myths and confusion spread by both their users, proponents, the media and the government. In recent years, a small group of dedicated researchers and scholars have orchestrated a renaissance in psychedelic research and thought. Horizons brings together the brightest minds and the boldest voices of this movement to share their research, insights, and dreams for the future.

Horizons website: http://www.horizonsnyc.org/site/

Facebook event: http://www.facebook.com/events/141413802665919/

This year, the wonderful speakers will be:

William Auerbach, Ph.D., psychologist…

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Psychedelic Press UK

Inspired by surrealists such as Picasso, Dali, Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera, Tokio Aoyama also channels through his art the essences of peace, ascension and love, embodied by musicians such as Bob Marley, Jimi Hendrix, Stevie Wonder and Sun Ra, as well as celebrating the free-spirited nature of artists including Miles Davis, Sly Stone and Basquiat. Tokio’s art is his soul and the philosophy of his life and he has been kind enough to answer some questions for PsypressUK in the run up to his forthcoming exhibition at the Hoxton Gallery in London.

What is it about art that first drew you into becoming an artist?  Furthermore, who and what have been the biggest influences on your art since?

I painted Al Pacino about 12 years ago and that was my first canvas painting with acrylic paints. I remembered how I was struggling with controlling my brush on the canvas, at the…

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Bangkok Hypnosis

ScienceDaily (Mar. 8, 2012) — Several decades ago, a number of clinics used LSD to treat alcoholism with some success. But until now, no research has pulled together the results of these trials to document exactly how effective LSD was. Now a new meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials of the drug, available in the Journal of Psychopharmacology, published by SAGE, provides evidence for a clear and consistent beneficial effect of LSD for treating alcohol dependency.

Teri Krebs and Pål-Ørjan Johansen are both affiliated with the Department of Neuroscience at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway. During research fellowships at Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA, they spotted a gap in the understanding of lysergic acid diethylamide’s (LSD’s) potential for alcoholism treatment. No researcher had ever performed a quantitative meta-analysis of previous clinical trials using the drug.

Krebs and Johansen set out to independently extract data from previous randomized, controlled clinical…

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  1. The mind seems to be linked with neurological states.
  2. Drug prohibition removes an individual’s ability to control their own neurological states.Therefore
  3. Drug prohibition is a form of mind control.https://i1.wp.com/www.retroskatestickers.com/gal/alienworkshop/img/mindcontrol.jpgDiscussion

    In simplest terms, drug prohibition is an attempt by the state to place limitations on both the neurological states and corresponding psychological states or its citizenry.

    By a remarkable coincidence, some of these drugs (the psychedelics) are the same drugs which allow users access to profound spiritual experiences, insights and personal transformations. Most users of psychedelics report these effects, most users feel they were benefitted by the experience.

    By controlling the substances that produce these states of mind, the government is, in effect, controlling the spiritual lives of its population.

    Since it is pretty irrefutable and simple logic to assert that drug prohibition is a form of mind control, the real question we need to answer is ‘why?’

    When we ask ‘Why?’ we are asking ‘For what reason?’

    The idea that psychedelics are unsafe and the state is ‘protecting its citizens’ is demonstrably false. LSD, for example, is far safer than most other recreational drugs, far safer than many of the drugs the NHS currently deals (and sometimes forcibly injects into its mentally ill patients) and safer than many other forms of legal recreational activity (e.g. extreme sports), or non-recreational activity.

    Isn’t it strange how the state feels it must protect its citizens mental health when it comes to drugs like LSD, but is perfectly happy to see new-born babies raised in-front of an unending stream of corporate brainwashing in the form of adverts?

    It claims to be worried that LSD will ’cause suicide’ – and yet it seems remarkably unconcerned by those other factors which actually cause suicide: debts, stress, unrewarding jobs, the resentment of being at the losing end of vast economic inequality, the squalor of our urban environments, the decay of spirituality.

    The state’s only interest is economic. It only cares about the moral and spiritual wellbeing of its citizens as long as that wellbeing coheres with its own economic interests. Religions that ensure people will keep being exploited through their mundane jobs, pay their taxes, and keep consuming: they’re ok, any other forms of spirituality that threaten the interests of the capitalist elite are persecuted and criminalised.

    When the so-called ‘hippies’ of the 1960s/70s used LSD they ‘turned on, tuned in, and dropped out‘, the meaning of this ‘dropping out’ is a key issue here. Essentially, LSD helps individuals to deconstruct the conditioning they have been raised on, it reminds people of who they were before society’s consumer-capitalist-military-industrial brainwashing.

    What can we learn about mass-LSD consumption from the hippies? What was it that terrified the state so much when large swathes of the population began to use LSD? It certainly didn’t seem to harm the individuals themselves, they seemed to be preoccupied with ‘peace’, ‘love’, ‘harmony’, ‘going with the flow’, music and art, and, perhaps most importantly, reforming the corrupt political machine they felt they were at the mercy of.

    There is no aspect of humanity more personal, more intimate, more sacred, than our capacity to transcend and commune with the divine aspect of life: it says a great deal about our culture that such an innate capacity is forbidden.

    Our economy (and therefore our society) is not driven by spiritually wholesome values. It is driven by greed, it is driven by selfishness. It depends on exploitation of humans, animals, and nature, on every level. It is based on manufacturing discontent so as to enslave the population. It is based on raising children to be killers so that they can go to other countries and steal their resources.

    These values run contrary to the teachings of all the world’s major religions: religions which have long become compliant with and corrupted by the ways of consumer-capitalism.

    Could it be that LSD and other psychedelics show people spiritual truths that the status quo would rather remained forgotten? Spiritual truths that threaten the delusions, the greed, and the selfishness, upon which our economy is based?

    The war on psychedelics is precisely a war on spiritual consciousness. A war motivated by the politics of dominant-culture vs counter-culture: not health, as is pretended.

    For the un-initiated: when it comes to the personal choice to take LSD, read the scientifc research for yourself and then make up your own mind about whether it is in your interests to take it or not and read the reports of people who have actually used it.

Mr. Lee Magazine

The loyal and patriotic bombardier, as depicted in Joseph Heller’s Catch-22, is labeled as crazy by some peers for embracing the risk of death as a civil duty, never questioning those in higher ranks, and surrendering total allegiance to a bureaucracy, which is just as ignorant and blindly patriotic. Among many other debates on ethics where a side remains confident in appealing to an authority, the “drug war” or “war on drugs” has seen little success considering public discourse on the matter, which has barely evolved from the beginning of the 20th century.

Prohibition is arguably the most recognized example of a U.S. policy backfire that created more issues than initially was being fought against. In the minds of contemporary prohibitionists, alcohol corrupted health and morality; it was an evil drink, which transformed good, honest men into raggedy and greasy loners, burping and lurching their way to the…

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Did we hear that correctly? Richard Dawkins is curious about the LSD experience!?

Just think for one moment how this could change things… The King of Atheism being given a ticket to see The Absolute…

Dear psychedelic users of the world, your mission, should you choose to accept it…

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